Saturday, October 10

Name these song-writers and authors

(Click the images to enlarge) The two walls were created by Hastings Bournemouth from "Written Words Home for Writers".

14 comments:

Radagast said...

I feel like a complete charlatan - I can only name four, for certain, plus three other maybes, all from the bottom image...

Bob Marley (extreme left), Bob Dylan (top and centre), the great Leonard Cohen (extreme right), John Lennon (bottom right), with the "maybes" being Bill Bragg (bottom centre), Tracey Chapman (bottom left), and Kirsty MacColl (top right).

I guess I'm not the well-read muso that I thought I was!

Matt

Ana said...

You are... right.

Matt, please, James Joyce (with hat on the right bottom) and Virginia Woolf ( in the middle of the first line looking sad at the floor)!
You have to know these two.
I'm glad you came!
Seriously!
Love,
Ana

Radagast said...

I've gotta be honest, Ana - no, unless you'd told me, I wouldn't have had clue! The guy bottom left of the authors looks vaguely like Charles Dickens, but seeing as Dickens was of an era before photography, it's not likely to be him!

Matt

PS Of the songwriters, who's the woman in the pork pie hat, sandwiched between Marley and Dylan? I've a sense that I recognize her, but can't put a name to the face.

Ana said...

I believe that the sandwiched woman is Suzanne Vega.
I have to confess that I have hidden Garcia Marques's photography, He is the only photo that is not in black and white and at the bottom, second photo.
I will search the authors I don't recognize and will publish the answer.
I know you have read the only book he wrote that I like so sorry from hiding him.
LOL

Radagast said...

Suzanne Vega? I'm not sure I'd have got that. Incidentally, I was just noting the demographic: 2 Americans (I think Chapman's American, anyway), 2 Canadians, 2 Brits, 1 Jamaican and 1 Irish. I'm not sure that means anything, but still.

And I wouldn't have got Marquez, either! I've read several of his works, but I don't think I've ever seen a picture of him.

Matt

Ana said...

I also do the demographics. :)
You are not losing too much by not seeing Garcia Marquez.
There is nothing special in his looks and no charm.
Borges, Cortázar, Cabrera Infante or even Llosa are more interesting.
You just gave me an idea: I'll make one of these with the Latin writers but I'll put their names.
I'm just sorry that not a single Brazilian is known.
But maybe among the musicians I can find some known names.

Radagast said...

Well, you undoubtedly know the Brazilian literary scene better than I... I should think the issue is with getting translated - there aren't many authors writing in a foreign language that become widely published in english. We've mentioned Marquez, but he's unusual in this regard, I think.

I mean, how long did it take writers of the calibre of Doumas, Balzac, Hugo, Tolstoi and Dostoyevsky to get translated? I think a book has to be a really big thing in the author's native country, before there's any kind of foreign interest (eg, The Kite Runner).

Anyway, what about Paulo Coelho?


Matt

Ana said...

No! Paulo Coelho is not a writer.
He worked in the merchandise office of Polygram a record company and know a lot about it.
He wrote self-help books disguised as literature and knew very well how to promote himself.
I once took one of these and read it till page 5.
Crap!
We have Guimarães Rosa translated into English as "The Devil to Pay in the Backlands)"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jo%C3%A3o_Guimar%C3%A3es_Rosa
Take a look
I'll write about it.
We have Machado de Assis "The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joaquim_Maria_Machado_de_Assis
These are real writers!
Unfortunately it's not for the public and today libraries don't care about good literature.
Machado de Assis was influenced by Tristam Shandy and has a great humour.

The funny thing: I asked the creator of this wall the names of all writers to publish here: he is searching because he forgot!
So we are all forgiven!
lol

I love when you come here Matt!

Ana said...

I did read Kite Runner.
I think it's a good way to understand what happened at Afghanistan. Very sensitive...

Ana said...

Machado de Assis did a translation of Edgar Poe's The raven.

Radagast said...

Ana wrote:
"...I love when you come here Matt!"

It's funny: I don't really know what to say to that! "It's nice to be wanted, for a change," I suppose, although "I enjoy coming here," would be an equally honest response!

You know, I've spent my life being put in boxes by one person and another (literally, in at least one case). I see what people think I am, but I'm just a mirror, which they can never admit, especially when they see something ugly. I'm tired of people projecting their stuff onto me.

Another funny thing: nobody has ever allowed me into their world, to my knowledge. And yet, despite the secrecy, I was supposed to assimilate myself into human society, when nobody was prepared to assimilate themselves into my world, nor even find out what my world amounted to? The upshot being that I've often been refused the right to consider my own thoughts valid. As a practical issue, how can this be achieved? And now, it seems, I must disappear without trace - this is the message that I'm receiving. Gladly.

Anyway, a negative deserves to be looped into a positive association - I find that a very effective way of neutralizing the unpleasantness, which is why I wrote the previous paras: it's an opportunity to repair myself, a little more, which is all I'm doing, these days. Why would anybody not wish we me to do that, I wonder?

Matt

Ana said...

Matt,
If I could write the way you do.
You don't realize not only your writing but all the wisdom you have.
We have been exchanging some thoughts by e-mail or in blogs and I already know your style.
Could you please do us a favor and write more about what you know?
I have to e-mail you because I have things to say to you in private.
I'll do it tomorrow morning.
Love,
Ana

Radagast said...

Well, that's the thing... I perceive that people regard some of my observations as insightful (occasionally "inciteful"?). However, I also perceive that very few have been willing to acknowledge that, for whatever reason that they have. When I've suggested that people have been "stealing ideas" from me, that is what I mean - in a world where ideas are jealously guarded, and exploited for all they're worth, in monetary terms, I find this irritating. A joint discussion that yields a recognizable result will be presented as the other party's own work... Protect one's own ideas, but feel free to steal others', and claim them as one's own? That seems to be the message.

Unfortunately for the thieves, when one refuses to acknowledge the excellence of something, eventually it will cease to have value - these are the games that we play with our own minds. Because they have been able to deceive me into giving my ideas away for nothing, and having profited from those ideas, some believe themselves somehow more intelligent, or superior in some sense, I understand. At that point, any pretense towards civility is usually dispensed with, and attempts at ridicule and humiliation begin. It is a pattern that is common to many, I've noted. And, in truth, they've given themselves no other choice.

[shrug] Unless everybody is important, then nobody is important - one cannot have gradations of importance, as a matter of fact. Not in my world, anyway.

Matt

Ana said...

Inciteful...
uuuuhhhh! I know what it's to listen other people telling you something they learned from you.
It used to make me annoyed but not anymore.
I realized that I'm always creating new stuffs and that's okay.
I find it harder and harder to people acknowledge others.
This is sad because if you have nobody to admire your world is so empty!
Once again: please write it all Matt.
Seriously! I'm sure if you start writing you will have a great work.
I will search for the site that is gathering people to write 1.500 words a day.
It's a kind of contest. I'll search for that and will send you the e-mail I promised later.